Mary Sullivan’s Studio Tour

Today on Tuesday Tours, we’re fortunate to get a tour of award-winning illustrator Mary Sullivan lovely Texas home and studio. Mary’s book BALL was a 2014 ALA Theodor Seuss Geisel Honor Book and has also landed on the Notable Children’s Books list. BALL is such a fun book, it’s impossible not to smile while thumbing through the pages. And after seeing the fun things that surround Mary as she works in her studio, it’s no wonder the book is so light and energetic—it’s reflective of the beautiful space where Mary creates her work. In addition to Mary’s children’s book illustrations, she has worked with Highlights for Children, Scholastic, Innovative Kids, School Zone, Oxford Press UK, Pearson, and many more. skyberg-tuesday-tours-logome
Tell us a little bit about yourself and your creative medium.

This is a job Mary did for Highlight's High Five Magazine.

This is a job Mary did for Highlight’s High Five Magazine.

I’ve been drawing for as long as I can remember. While I raised my two kids I made a little money here and there doing random illustration jobs for logos, T-shirts, brochures and stuff like that. When the kids were grown and my life was less chaotic, I decided to hone in on children’s illustration and in about 2002 I got my first job was with Highlights Magazine.
Since then, I’ve done tons of educationaI illustration, several PB’s and finally published my own book BALL in 2012.  It won the 2014 Geisel Honor. I begin most jobs in pencil on Strathmore drawing paper.  I color digitally in Photoshop.

Welcome to my studio

The entrance to Mary’s studio/home.

How long have you had your space and how does it affect your creative process?
I have been in this space since 2000. I knew right away that it was going to be special.  I went on a creative binge immediately after moving in. I am sensitive to light and sound. Lights must be low and sound must be almost nonexistent. My home/studio has that and more. My studio is not one room. It is spread out into the whole of a tiny house.

Where Mary has her morning coffee.

Where Mary has her morning coffee.

I flow throughout the spaces that surround me, indoors and outdoors. Each space plays a crucial role in nurturing my creative mind. The pics I’m sharing are not of trinkets and what-nots or books or special toys. They are big things. Things that I can put body into. A cozy chair, a sauna, a soaking tub, an outdoor shower. These are the things that I absolutely must have. The things that get me to that place in my mind where I can let go. The place in my mind where creativity happens.

What a great way of talking about your space! It really is in the entire space that the work is created. The small things add comfort and inspiration, but the spaces we can, as you said, put body in, are highly influential to the creative spirit. desk

Please tell us about a time you had the most fun working in your studio.
I took a bunch of giant newsprint and charcoal. I put on some Rammestien (totally opposite to what I normally listen to) and made a huge charcoal mess. It really helped me unclog. I think i should do that again!

Yes! Freestyle art hour—a great way to get unstuck :)

Mary's favorite place to sit and draw.

Mary’s favorite place to sit and draw.

Does music influence how you work? What’s on your playlist now?
I listen to Brian Eno Radio on Pandora or some Mantra music pretty much all the time.  Towards the end of the day, after work, I might switch to something more upbeat. But while I work, I really have to have quiet music.  Some days I just can’t listen to anything.  My thoughts can get really quiet. They almost whisper and any sound is is distracting.

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Who are some illustrators that have influenced your work?
As a child, I was completely enchanted by the illustrations of Arthur Rackham. Also, Norman Rockwell and Denise Holly Ulinskas had a huge influence on me.  

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Is there a favorite drink or food that you have while you work?
For drink, I start my day with a small cup of coffee with cream, then I move on to Earl Grey tea, which is my most fave drink.  Fave food is definitely curry tofu and toasted nori seaweed. And no, i am not a vegetarian.  :-)

Mary's very own unsafe playground equipment! She LOVES this piece from the trash at a daycare. She says, "Just having it around makes me feel happy. And anything that makes me smile, helps me create.

Mary’s very own unsafe playground equipment! She LOVES this piece that she rescued from the trash at a daycare. She says, “Just having it around makes me feel happy. And anything that makes me smile, helps me create.”


What are the three best things about your studio?
My space has two doors that are opposite each other.  I love opening them both and letting the breeze blow through. I love having my animals around me when I work. I have easy access to the outdoors….which is my main source of inspiration.

Mary's outdoor shower--sometimes a quick rinse outside is all she needs to reenergize.

Mary’s outdoor shower–sometimes a quick rinse outside is all she needs to reenergize.

When she needs to solve problems she takes a soak in her tub.

When she needs to solve problems she takes a soak in her tub.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is where stories happen. At 140 degrees they just back out of Mary's brain.

This is where stories happen. At 140 degrees they just bake out of Mary’s brain.

If you could add a new tool or piece of furniture to your studio, what would it be?Right now, I have everything I need!  But that may change tomorrow.  :-)

She's currently working on a book of spaceships.

She’s currently working on a book of spaceships.

What colors inspire your creativity.  Are those colors incorporated in your space?
I do love Yellows, Oranges, Pinks and Greens. I do not care for blues.

What advice do you have for people who want to make a personal space where they can be creative?
My space sort of formed itself around me.  I didn’t really plan any of it.

A page from Mary's book BALL!

A page from Mary’s book BALL!

I love when that happens! And especially when it happens so beautifully. 

 

Sketches from Mary's book about Frankie.

Sketches from Mary’s book about Frankie.

What’s coming up for you and where can we find out more?
My next book FOOD (a sorta sequel to BALL) will be out in Spring 2016.  I have another book called Frankie that I have “almost” sold that I’m really excited about.  And, I may be doing one more one-word book titled TOY, similar to BALL and FOOD.  But that will be the last of the one word books I think. You can find me at http://www.marysullivan.com.

Thanks, Mary! I look forward to seeing your upcoming books. Frankie looks so lovable!

 

 

Book an author visit!

I’m currently booking for the 2014/2015 school year. If you’re interested in having me visit your school, please contact me to schedule a program.

I love visiting schools to share my experiences as an author and an illustrator. I have a number of presentations, workshops, and art residencies available. Below is a preview of some of my programs, but a higher quality PDF of my full program listing can be viewed here – Andrea Skyberg Author Visit Program Sheet (Full Version) 2014

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Todd Mrozinski’s Studio Tour

Today on Tuesday Tours Milwaukee-based artist Todd Mrozinski offers us a look inside his studio The Nut Factory, which he shares with his wife, artist Renee Bebeau. It is in this expansive studio space that most of Todd’s series live together, allowing him to see their relationship with each other. The studio is also a location that Todd and Renee offer art classes and workshops. Todd’s art is sprinkled throughout Milwaukee in various shops and restaurants, including my neighborhood favorite, Juniper61. He’s currently represented by the Woodman/Shimko Gallery.                       
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Todd Mrozinskui6Tell us a little bit about yourself and your creative medium.
I am a full time artist and teacher. I mainly work in oil paint because of the luminous and textural qualities it has. Above all else I follow inspiration. There are two subjects that currently hold my fascination, shadows and articles of clothing. For the past 2 years I have traced my subject’s shadow directly onto the canvas and used this drawing as the framework for the painting. For the last 15 years I have painted symbolic portraits of people by painting their clothing.

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How long have you had your space and how does it affect your creative process?
I have shared a 1,200 sq. ft. studio space with my wife, Renee Bebeau for about 2 years. Before the large studio I had a small, 80 sq. ft. living room studio, where I still do much of my work. I like to be close to the work and live with it. So much of it has been about my family, friends, yard, home and light. The quote about a Velazques painting being “not art but life perpetuated” has resonance with me. The bigger studio is great for larger work and is essential to seeing each series together. The home studio is the incubator and I can get into “the zone” there quite easily, especially during morning light.
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Todd Mrozinskui13Describe a typical work day in your studio.
On a usual studio day I get up early and paint at the home studio. Eat lunch, nap, paint more or do computer work, go to the larger studio in late afternoon, paint or hang work, have dinner, correspondence, paint at either studio until bedtime. Recently, studio visits have been a wonderful way to connect and get to know other artists.
 
Are there any kind of rituals you do before you start creating?
I light incence or a candle, lay my brushes out and prepare my palette. I calm my mind to focus entirely on the painting in front of me.
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Is there any special item/trinket in your space that inspires you? 
The items that inspire me most are the house plants because of their stillness and lush beauty. I’m also inspired by the recent paintings that hang around the studio which inform and encourage the next work. Todd Mrozinskui7
What would you say is the most useful tool in your studio?
The most useful tool in my studio is the brush I am holding. As a series progresses, the brushes and tools that I use become my daily companions.Todd Mrozinskui10
What advice do you have for people who want to make a personal space where they can be creative?
Make whatever space you have into a space to do your work. It is the most valuable thing you can do for yourself, and the others around you, because in the space of timeless play, life is enhanced and the spirit is uplifted. Make sure the space is well lit, comfortable and a place you want to spend time in. Todd Mrozinskui11
 
What colors inspire your creativity.  Are those colors incorporated in your space?
I’m intrigued by the secondary colors, most of my current work consists of orange, purple and green, with occasional alizerin and white. The mixing of these colors and the way they interact continuously mystifies me. We have warm brown walls in both our home and larger studio space. I like to view work on warm, neutral, walls because it is soothing to my eyes and sensibilities.
If you could share you studio with a famous artist, who would you chose?
David Hockney, he seems like a kind and enthusiastic man with a great sense of humor, from the interviews I have seen. I admire his intensity and passion for art.
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What’s coming up for you and where can we find out more?
I was chosen to be part of the Midwest Artist Studio Program. I will be showing at The Hide House during Bay View Gallery Night on Fri. Sept. 26. The Libations! and Shadow Portrait Series will be shown at LuLu Cafe in Bay View from Oct. 17 thru the New Year. Paintings from The Clothing Series will be in a group show, The Glass Menagerie: A Visual Dialogue, at 10th St. Gallery in Milwaukee from Sept. 22 – Nov. 7. Shadow Portraits will be at Bella Salon in Shorewood thru the New Year, and The Bouquet Shadow Series is showing at Juniper61 in Wauwatosa thru the New Year. You can visit me at http://toddmrozinski.com.
 
Thanks for sharing your studio with us, Todd! Seeing all of the shadow work together is really stunning. Best of luck with your upcoming shows!
 
Join us next week when we’ll get the chance to step inside Texan illustrator Mary Sullivan‘s studio where she created her award-winning picture book Ball!


Deborah Gross’s Studio Tour

Today on Tuesday Tours we get to take a peak into Wisconsin illustrator Deborah Gross’s studio where she produces illustrations for a number of publications such as National Geographic School Publishing, Compass Publishing, and Humpty Dumpty’s Magazine. Deborah is  the SCBWI Illustrator Coordinator for the Wisconsin chapter. She’s been illustrating for ten years and was recently chosen as a finalist for the Tomie dePaola illustrating contest through SCBWI! She’ll have a chance to enter a final round of illustrations, competing against fifteen other artists for a chance to win a free trip to New York City for the annual SCBWI NYC conference. We’re wishing her loads of luck and would love to see her fly out to the Big Apple come February!

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DebraGross12Tell us a little bit about yourself and your creative medium.
I’ve been working as a children’s illustrator for about 10 years. Most of what I do is for the classroom, such as early readers, foreign language dictionaries, and testing materials. I work both traditionally, with watercolor, colored pencil, ink, and digitally.

How long have you had your space and how does it affect your creative process
I’ve had my studio space for around 15 years, but it is definitely not the only place I create art. While raising my five kids I learned to work in all areas of the house, during lots of noise and activity, and with endless interruptions. Though I do all of my painting and digital work in my studio, I still prefer to sketch and work on initial ideas in my favorite recliner or on the front porch.

I bet your children and grandchildren provide lots of inspiration!
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Describe a typical work day. Do you have any rituals you do before you start creating?
Definitely, my day always starts with a mug or two of coffee! If I have the time, I like to check the news and weather, maybe even get dressed before I get to work. If my deadlines are tight, I just grab my coffee and go to work in my jammies.

Being able to go to work in your PJs is definitely a perk :)

Is there anything you like to listen to while you’re working? What are you reading/listening to now?
I can spend a lot of hours drawing and painting, so I need to vary what I’m listening to in order to keep my sanity. I listen to a lot of Pandora, with some of my recent favorites being my Ed Sheeran, Amos Lee, and Celtic Radio channels. If my project does not require a lot of concentration I’ll watch television, mostly random talk shows or HGTV.

DebraGross7I can see HGTV being an inspiring station to watch while working.

Is there any special item/trinket in your space that inspires you?
I have the first painting I ever did as a child, a print of Mickey Mouse painting himself as Walt Disney and a few things my kids made when they were young. My space doesn’t leave much room for collecting things, which is both a tragedy and a blessing.

What would you say is the most useful tool in your studio?
That’s a hard question, since there are so many parts of the illustration process that I use tools for. I would say my newest acquisition, a Cintiq tablet, is probably the tool I use the most. Even if the illustration is created traditionally, it will be delivered digitally, and the Cintiq makes that process easier and faster. You can hardly beat that!

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What advice do you have for people who want to make a personal space where they can be creative?
Find a space where you feel at home. It can be simple or fancy, whatever suites your taste and your budget. As long as your art materials are at hand, the lighting is good, and you feel relaxed and creative, it will be perfect.

Yes! Let the creative spirit move you, no matter where you are!DebraGross6

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When Deborah isn’t working on her illustrations, she’s most likely holding one of her 10 grandchildren.


What is your greatest source of inspiration to you as an artist?
I am constantly inspired by the work of other amazing illustrators. I have a very large library of children’s books by some of my favorites and I spend countless hours looking at images online, mostly through the black hole known as Pinterest. I’m also very fortunate to have 10 grandkids to play with, read to, and draw with. DebraGross4

What colors inspire your creativity?  Are those colors incorporated in your space?
I don’t really have specific colors that inspire me, I guess I would say that I’m more inspired by color groupings. I like to study the use of color in illustrations by some of my favorite artists. I also go to http://paletton.com/ to play around with color palettes.

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If you could transport your studio to another geographical location, where would it be and why?
My wish list here is very simple, I would love to transport my studio upstairs. The current location in my basement tends to be cold and lacks a view of the outside. For the time being I do all my initial work upstairs and head down to the studio to paint.

DebraGross3What are you working on now and where can we find out more?
I continue to work on illustrating educational materials for the classroom, which will be seen by countless students, but is really impossible to plug. The most exciting thing I’m working on is the Tomie dePaola illustration contest. I was chosen as one of 15 semi-finalists, and am currently waiting for art specs to the final part of the competition. It’s a great example of what the SCBWI has to offer! You can see more of my work on my website http://debgrossink.com/.

Thank you so much, Deborah! And congratulations on being a finalist for the Tomie dePaola illustration contest. Good luck–we’re rooting for you!

Join us next week when artist and teacher Todd Mrozinski gives a look inside his studio in The Nut Factory, which he shares with his wife Renee Bebeau.

Russ Cox’s Studio Tour

Today on Tuesday Tours we get to take a peak into illustrator and author Russ Cox’s cozy Maine studio. In addition to his work in children’s picture books, Russ has his own studio called Smiling Otis Studio, where he’s worked with a number of clients including, Warner Brothers, Hershey, American Greetings, and A&E. Russ will debut his first picture book as an author and illustrator next Spring with his book Faraway Friends (Sky Pony Press)—an action packed story that follows Sheldon and his dog, Jet as they try to build a spaceship to carry them to Jupiter, the place Sheldon believes his best friend has moved. 
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Russ Cox4Tell us a little bit about yourself and your creative medium.
Hello, my name is Russ Cox and I play banjo as well as juggle moose in the quaint town of Pittsfield, Maine. I also illustrate, and now write, children’s books. My wife and I, plus our 4 cats, moved up to Maine 6 years ago after living in an old city row home (early 1800s) in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. We always loved Maine, so when our last kid adventured into the world, we bought a little house in Pittsfield.
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My creative mediums are my sketchbooks, which I try to draw in daily, good old pencil and paper, along with my Macs and various software including Painter, Photoshop, and recently discovered Manga Studio. I still like the feel of pencil to paper. There is an emotional connection for me to using those two tools. Although I have started doing thumbnails and preliminary sketches on the computer to save time. I like Painter for sketching. It has more of a natural feel. As far as my banjo playing and moose juggling, they are works in progress.

DSCN1138How long have you had your space and how does it affect your creative process?
My studio space is very small and cozy, more so than my old studio in Pennsylvania which was three times the size. I like that I can almost reach everything in my studio by just wheeling around in my chair.
Wait, did that sound lazy? Having my tools and books within arms reach does save time and helps me stay in a creative groove. Whew, I think I redeemed myself after feeling lazy.
I have a wall dedicated to hanging pieces of art, story ideas, storyboards, etc. that are in various stages. This allows me to step back and view the work as a whole. I use Trapease Display Rails to hold the paper in place. My closet door has postcards from friends and artist I admire. It is called “My Wall of Inspiration”. You can learn so much by looking at the work of others, but you don’t want to get bogged down in doing that so much that you lose sight of your vision and goals.
Great advice! Inspiration is wonderful, but self-comparison can definitely cause the creative process to stall.

Describe a typical work day. Are there any rituals you have before you start creating? 
Recently, I started doing a new ritual where after I work out in the morning, I spend at least an hour on my own projects and stories. This helps me keep moving those projects along in case my agent needs samples, a new picture book dummy, and/or manuscript.
On Fridays, I go to our local library to write. It gets me out of the studio for a few hours, plus the the librarians are wonderful for feedback on story ideas or completed manuscripts and dummies.
Russ Cox2I really love that you have a library day each week! What a great place to work and also stay informed about what’s out there.
Is there anything you like to listen to while you’re working? What are you reading/listening to now?
I often listen to iTunes, Spotify, Coffitivity, and sometimes my small studio TV when I working at night. It is nice to hear people talking when you work by yourself so much. The Nerdist is one of my favorite Podcast. Music-wise, I listen to anything from The Ramones (great for sketching) to Old Time music to The Who to to alternative to comedy. The books on my nightstand are Jim Henson’s biography and I have started reading the Harry Potter series. Yeah, I know, I am a little behind the times.
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Is there any special item/trinket in your space that inspires you? 
My instruments. When I get stuck or need a quick break, I grab a banjo, guitar, or the bass and play. It helps clear my head so I can solve the problem, or if I am stuck.

What would you say is the most useful tool in your studio?
My light box. I use it more than my computers. I b
ought it at a print shop that went out of business. It is big enough for me to do larger pieces of artwork. Plus, one of our cats likes to sleep on it.
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What advice do you have for people who want to make a personal space where they can be creative?
Make the space your own. Let it be inspiring. You will spend most of your time in the space so it has to be comfortable and inviting. I feel that a work space is always evolving, just like a creative person. In the next few months, my space will change as I add a few more pieces of furniture like a flat file and more postcards.
Very true. I think it’s a great motivator to have a creative space that evolves with projects and personal growth.
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What age did you become interested in art and who encouraged you to pursue your dream?
As far back as I can remember, I was always drawing. Living out in the country in Tennessee there was not a lot of activities close by, so I would spend hours drawing and painting, and also marveling at the skills of other artist. Such as, the artwork in Mad magazine, Famous Monsters of Filmland, Little Golden Books, Warner Brothers Cartoons, and the artwork of Mary Blair. Every member of my family encouraged my art, and they still do.
It’s wonderful you had so much support, and to see it made such a big impact on what you do in the world.
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What colors inspire your creativity? Are those colors incorporated in your space?
I was into bright, bold colors, but now I am gearing my pallet into a more vintage scheme. Less saturation except for some key colors or accent color. I think Dan Santat, Lane Smith, John Rocco, and Shaun Tan have beautiful color schemes. Yes, you can see those vintage type colors through my studio.
What’s coming up for you and where can we find out more?

Well, I just finished all of the artwork for my first book that I wrote and illustrated called Faraway Friends that comes out April 2015 via Sky Pony Press. I am very excited about it!
Russ CoxThe next book in the Freddy the Frogcaster series (Regnery Kids) comes out in September and I have begun work on the third book. I illustrated Lynn Plourde’s new book, A Merry Moosey Christmas, which comes out in October (Islandport Press). Plus there is a new project that I am very excited about doing, but I can’t talk about just yet. You can see more of my work at http://www.smilingotis.com.
Thank you, Russ, for the wonderful interview and tour! Best of luck on all of your new books. 
Join us next week, when we hear from Wisconsin illustrator Deborah Gross who was recently selected as a semi-finalist for the SCBWI Tomie dePaulo illustration contest. 

Artist & Author Programs for 2014/2015

I’m currently booking for the 2014/2015 school year. If you’re interested in having me visit your school, please contact me to schedule a program.

I love visiting schools to share my experiences as an author and an illustrator. I have a number of presentations, workshops, and art residencies available. Below is a preview of some of my programs, but a higher quality PDF of my full program listing can be viewed here – Andrea Skyberg Author Visit Program Sheet (Full Version) 2014

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Cynthia Lord’s Studio Tour

Today on Tuesday Tours I’m eager to share author Cynthia Lord’s backyard writing shed because it’s so darn cute and looks like the perfect place to write. Cynthia is a former elementary and middle-school teacher who broke into the world of writing for children with her deput mid grade book Rules, which later went on to win a Newbery Honor award. Rules is a beautiful story about a family’s attempt to deal with difference and acceptance in the face of autism, and the community that surrounds them. Cynthia’s other novels, Touch Blue and Half a Chance are equally engaging, addressing issues of belonging and friendship. My daughter’s school chose Touch Blue as an all-school-read book a few years ago, and my family loved reading it together. Cynthia is also the author of the Hot Rod Hamster series, illustrated by Derek Anderson, including the new Hot Rod Hamster Monster Truck Mania, all published by Scholastic. In addition to sharing her studio with us, today’s also special because Cynthia’s releasing her newest book Shelter Pet Squad. She lives in Brunswick, Maine with her family, a dog, a guinea pig, and two bunnies.

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Cynthia Lord4Tell us a little bit about yourself and your creative medium.
I’m a children’s book author of picture books, early-readers, chapter books and middle-grade novels.

How long have you had your space, how did it come to be, and how does it affect your creative process?
I write my books in my backyard writing shed. My first book, Rules, won a Newbery Honor in 2007, and this shed was the present that I bought myself. It was the best money I ever spent on my writing career because it makes such a wonderful difference to have my own space. My family joked that my little shed was like Thoreau’s Walden Pond cabin. So we’ve named my shed “Walden Backyard.”

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Are there any kinds of rituals you do before you start creating?Cynthia Lord
My dog, Milo, loves to come out to my shed with me. I pack up my laptop and say to Milo, “Let’s go work!” He runs right out to the shed.  I unlock the door and give him a treat and then sit down to work. Milo usually sleeps while I work, but his enthusiasm starts every work session on a happy note.

Is there anything you like to listen to while you’re working? What are you reading/listening to now?
I have a CD or musician that I listen to for each novel. The musician for my current novel is Spencer Lewis. I picked up a few of his CDs when I was doing a school visit in Vermont, and his music captures the rural northern New England essence of the book I’m working on.Cynthia Lord9

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Is there any special item/trinket in your space that inspires you?
My writing shed is full of things that inspire me—kids’ choice awards, items that go with my books, things that children have made for me. Because Rules has a rubber ducky on the cover, people give those to me. I have well over 200!

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Wow! That’s a lot of rubber duckies! They make a fantastic display. I bet you’re going to have to add some new shelves soon, especially after people see your collection ;)

 

If you could magically transplant your writing shed to another location for half of the year, where would it be?
I grew up on a lake in New Hampshire, and I love to kayak. So I would move it to a quiet lakeside in northern New England somewhere.

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What advice do you have for people who want to make a personal space where they can be creative?
I would say do it! It’s easy to put your own needs last, especially if you’re a parent. Starting my day early in my writing shed sets my whole day right. I’m a better mom and a better writer for honoring my need to have some space and time of my own.

Yes! As parents we often make spaces for our children and visiting company, yet we often we forget about making a place for ourselves. 

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What colors inspire your creativity? Are those colors incorporated in your space?
I like soothing colors and nature. So my writing shed has wood walls. Rocks, sticks, and shells line the windowsills. Outside the window, I see my gardens and bird feeders.

 

Cynthia Lord3You travel a lot while visiting schools for author visits. How does being in a new place affect your writing?
I can’t write well on the road, so I try to arrange my year into three months of writing, followed by three months of speaking, etc. I do very few events in the summer and winter—that’s my writing time. In the spring and fall I do lots of events.

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What a great way to organize your writing life with the speaking part of your career! I think working at them equally in concentrated amounts of time would help hold your focus on both ends.

What’s coming up for you and where can we find out more?
This month I have a chapter book series starting called Shelter Pet Squad. It stars a second grader who can’t have a pet of her own and so she volunteers in her local animal shelter. In each book, she will help find a home for an animal. The first book is called Jelly Bean, and he is a guinea pig. You can find me at http://www.cynthialord.com.

What a fun concept! My daughter’s been asking for a pet for quite awhile. I finally gave in and said she could get a guinea pig. Maybe I should’ve had her volunteer at the Humane Society instead!  Thanks so much for sharing your writing shed with us, Cynthia. I’ll be picking up a copy of the Shelter Pet Squad on our way to pick up our new pet :)

Join us next week when author and artist Russ Cox shares his cozy corner in Maine where he creates his clever characters and stories.